• Turkish
  • English
Course Code: 
SOC 216
Semester: 
Spring
Course Type: 
Core
P: 
3
Lab: 
0
Laboratuvar Saati: 
0
Credits: 
3
ECTS: 
7
Prerequisite Courses: 
Course Language: 
English
Course Objectives: 
The aim of the course is to shed light on possibilities of sociological perspective in a study of law as an important social institution, a symbolical form, a source of social order and control.
Course Content: 

The course deals with a specific field of sociology – sociology of law – that is usually grasped as an interdisciplinary subject between law and sociology. First lessons are devoted to sociological theories of law and later the theoretical approaches are concretized in lessons on empirical phenomena as legal culture, legal action and legal profession. 

Course Methodology: 
1: Lecture, 2: Question-Answer, 3: Discussion, 9: Simulation, 12: Case Study
Course Evaluation Methods: 
A: Testing, C: Homework

Vertical Tabs

Course Learning Outcomes

Course Learning Outcomes

Programme Learning Outcomes

Teaching Methods

Assessment Methods

1) The student is able to define and distinguish different perspectives of legal sociology, jurisprudence, and common sense.

8,7

1,2,3

A,C

2) The student orients herself/himself in the tradition of socio-legal theory and is capable of applying this theoretical background when writing a research proposal and formulating a research design.

8,6

1,2,3

A,C

3) The student receives an overview of main legal system and types of law within a legal system, while forming skills to identify and critically assess similarities and differences among the legal systems in contemporary societies.

3,4

1,2,3

A,C

4) The student is able, theoretically and empirically, to understand and explain the mutual influence between the social institution of law and social change.

1,7

1,2,3

A,C

5)  The student possesses skills in using both quantitative (e.g. secondary /document/ analysis) and qualitative (e.g. ethnography, textual analysis) methodological approaches in the study of interaction between law and society.

1,3

1,2,3

A,C

6) The student is able to critically discuss the problems of legal disputes, courts, law enforcement, and legal profession in general and also apprehends the diversity of theoretical approaches to the study of law. 

3,5,10

1,2,3

A,C

7) The student builds a perspective enabling him or her to associate the transformation of legal practice since the late 20th century to broader processes of globalization.

4,7

1,2,3

A,C

 
 

Course Flow

Week

Topics

Study Materials

1

An introduction to the course Sociology of Law. Defining the field of this sociological subdiscipline.

Sutton, John R. 2001. Law/Society: Origins interactions and change. London: Pine Forge Press. 

 

2

What is Law? Sociological perspective on law

Vago, Steven (2011). “What is Law.” Pp.  Law and Society. 10th ed. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Rocher G. 2001. “Law, Sociology of.” Pp. 8544-8548 in International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences. Edited by Neil J. Smelser & Paul B. Baltes. Oxford: Pergamon.

 

3

Types of law, Legal systems, Legal system in Turkey

Vago, Steven (2011). “Types of Law.” Pp.  Law and Society. 10th ed. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Tuncay, Aziz Can. 2007. “The Three Most Important Features of Turkey’s Legal System That Others Should Know.” Pp. 241-247 in Proceeding of IALS Conference: Learning from Each Other. Soochow University, Kenneth Wang School of Law Suzhou, China. October 17-19, 2007.

Bal, Hüseyin. 2003. “Hukuk Sistemleri” & “Türk Hukuk Sisteminin Bölümleri”. Pp. 20-22 & 32-34 in Hukuk Sosyolojisi. İsparta: SDÜ Yay.

 

4

Sociological theories of law: Origins of thought on law. Classical Sociology (I): H. Maine, E. Durkheim.

Durkheim, Émile. 2005 (1893). “The Division of Labour in Society” and “Two Laws of Penal Evolution.” Pp. 19-42 in Readings from Emile Durkheim, edited by Kenneth Thompson. London & New York: Routledge.

 

5

Classical Sociology (II): M. Weber, K. Marx

Weber, Max. “The Economy and Social Norms” & “Economy and Law (Sociology of Law): Fields of Substantive Law.” Pp. 311-338, 641-666 in Weber, Max. Economy and Society : An Outline of Interpretive

Sociology, edited by. G. Roth & C. Wittich. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.

Cotterrell, Roger 1997. “Marx: Repressive and Ideological Functions of Law.” Pp. 106-114 in The Sociology of Law: An Introduction. 2nd ed. London: Butterworths.

 

6

Sociology of law in 20th century: Structural functionalism (T. Parsons), System theory (N. Luhmann).

Cotterrell, Roger 1997. “Social System and Social Structure: Parsons.” Pp. 81-91 in The Sociology of Law: An Introduction. London: Butterworths.

Cotterrell, Roger 1997. “A Note on Autopoiesis Theory.” Pp. 65-70 in The Sociology of Law: An Introduction. London: Butterworths.

 

7

Conflict Theory (W. Chambliss, A. Turk), Micro-sociological Approaches to Law (Phenomenology, Ethnomethodology, Social Construction of Law).

Deflem, M. 2008. “Towards a Critical Sociology of Law.” Pp. 122-126 in Sociology of Law: Visions of Scholarly Tradition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Cotterrell, Roger 1997. “Microsociological Approaches: Phenomenology, Ethnomethodology and Social Interaction.” Pp. 145-148 in The Sociology of Law: An Introduction. London: Butterworths.

 

8

Social basis of law. Law and Social Control.

Mawhinney, Alison and Iorwerth Griffiths. 2011. “Ensuring that Others Behave Responsibly: Giddens, Governance, and Human Rights Law. Social & Legal Studies, 20(4), pp. 481–498.

Pashukanis, Evgeny. 1980 (1924). “Commodity and Subject”. Pp. 109-133 in Selected Writings on Marxism and Law. London & New York: Academic Press.

 

9

Law as a factor of social change. Legal Action.

Pogány, István. 2012. “Pariah Peoples: Roma and the Multiple Failures of Law in Central and Eastern Europe.” Social & Legal Studies, 21(3), pp. 375–393.

Kalem Berk, Seda. 2011. Kadınlar ve ‘Adalete Erişim’: Türkiye özelinde kısa bir değerlendirme. Amargi, Yaz 2011, Sayı 21.

 

10

Law, Power and Ideology.

Hunt, Alan. 1985. “The Ideology of Law: Advances and Problems in Recent Applications of the Concept of Ideology to the Analysis of Law.” Law & Society Review, 19 (1), pp. 11-38.

Silbey, Susan S. 1998. “Ideology.” Pp. 272-308 in Justice and Power in Sociolegal Studies, edited by Bryan G. Garth & Austin Sarat. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press. 

 

11

Legitimacy of Law, Legal Socialization. Legal Culture.

Ewick, Patricia & Susan Silbey. 2003. “Narrating Social Structure: Stories of Resistance to Legal Authority.” American Journal of Sociology, 108 (6): 1328-1372.

Visegrady, Antal. 2001. “Legal Cultures in the European Union”. Acta Juridica Hungarica, 42 (3-4): 203-217.

 

12

The legal profession.

Parsons, Talcott. 1954. “A Sociologist Looks at the Legal Profession.” Pp. 370-385 in Essays in Sociological Theory. Glencoe, IL: The Free Press.

 

13

Judges, Courts, Disputes.

Tracy, Karen. 2009. “How questioning constructs judge identities: oral argument about same-sex marriage.” Discourse Studies, 11(2): pp. 199–221.

 

14

Transformation of legal practice in the late 20th century

Deflem, Mathieu. 2006. “Global Rule of Law or Global Rule of Law Enforcement? International Police Cooperation and Counterterrorism.” Anals, AAPSS, 603: 240-251.

Sterett, Susan. 2004. “Immigration.” Pp. 354-368 in The Blackwell Companion to Law and Society. Edited by Austin Sarat. Oxford, UK & Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing.

 
 
 

Recommended Sources

Textbook

Vago, Steven (2011). Law and Society. 10th ed. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice Hall. 

Additional Resources

Cotterrell, Roger (1997). The Sociology of Law: An Introduction. 2nd ed. London: Butterworths.

Deflem, M. (2008). Sociology of Law: Visions of Scholarly Tradition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Milovanovic, Dragan (2003). Introduction to Sociology of Law. Monsey, NY: Criminal Justice Press. 

Sarat, Austin (ed.). (2004). The Blackwell Companion to Law and Society. Oxford, UK & Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing.

Sutton, John R. (2001). Law/Society: Origins interactions and change. London: Pine Forge Press.

 
 

Material Sharing

Documents

 

Assignments

 

Exams

 

 
 

Assessment

IN-TERM STUDIES

NUMBER

PERCENTAGE

Mid-terms

1

50

Quizzes

2

20

Assignment

1

30

Total

 

100

CONTRIBUTION OF FINAL EXAMINATION TO OVERALL GRADE

 

40

CONTRIBUTION OF IN-TERM STUDIES TO OVERALL GRADE

 

60

Total

 

100

 

 

COURSE CATEGORY

Expertise/Field Courses

 
 

Course’s Contribution to Program

No

Program Learning Outcomes

Contribution

1

2

3

4

5

1

     

X

   

2

   

X

     

3

       

X

 

4

         

X

5

   

X

     

6

     

X

   

7

   

X

     

8

         

X

9

 

X

       

10

   

X

     

11

 

X

       
 
 

ECTS

ECTS ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT WORKLOAD BY THE COURSE DESCRIPTION

Activities

Quantity

Duration
(Hour)

Total
Workload
(Hour)

Course Duration (Including the exam week: 16x Total course hours)

16

3

48

Hours for off-the-classroom study (Pre-study, practice)

15

7

105

Mid-terms

1

3

3

Homework

1

5

5

Final examination

1

10

10

Total Work Load

 

 

171

Total Work Load / 25 (h)

 

 

6,8

ECTS Credit of the Course

 

 

7