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Course Code: 
ELIT 318
Semester: 
Spring
Course Type: 
Core
P: 
3
Credits: 
3
ECTS: 
5
Course Language: 
English
Course Objectives: 
The course aims at an understanding of the development of literature from the 1780s into the 1830s, as well as an understanding and appreciation of poetry: how to read poetry; how to analyze verse forms; how poetic devices function and how to make sense of poetic license. The course also aims to examine a portion of the wide range of poetry written during this period.
Course Content: 

In the period from 1786 to 1830, seven major poets emerged who permanently affected the nature of English language and literature. Blake, Burns, Wordsworth, and Coleridge may be regarded as the first generation of Romantic poets, writing most of their major works from 1786 to 1805. Byron, Shelley, and Keats are the second generation, producing their major works from 1810 to 1824. In addition to these major poets several other poets have also produced works of character and quality which should not be forgotten.

Course Methodology: 
1: Lecture, 2: Question-Answer, 3: Discussion, 12: Text Study
Course Evaluation Methods: 
A: Testing B: Presentation C: Homework

Vertical Tabs

Course Learning Outcomes

Learning Outcomes Programme Learning Outcomes Teaching Methods Assessment Methods
1) Knowledge of and ability to make close readings of poetry written between 1785-1832 1, 2 1,2,3 A
2) Knowledge of the intellectual, historical, political and religious context of the works 1, 7, 10 1,2,3 A
3) Ability to write essays and commentaries on the works of the period 1, 2, 3 1,2,3 A
4) To analyze selected poetry of the period, developing an understanding of how the poet has composed/organized the poem 1, 2, 7 1,2,3 A
5) To equip the students with knowledge of works and authors of the age 2, 3, 7 1,2,3 A
6) To understand the development of English literature throughout the Romantic Period. 2, 7 1,2,3 A

 

Course Flow

COURSE CONTENT
Topics Materials
General Introduction; course requirements. Romantic Period Historical Background: The early 19th Century Scene

A Survey of Guidelines: How to Read Poetry;

Instructor
Romantic Poetry: A Quick Survey of Romantic Poets and Their Works in the Early Romantic Era; Highlights of Romantic Poetry: form, structure & theme; lyric poetry; narrative poetry; sonnet; meter;  
The Pre-Romantics: William Blake (1757—1827) [Introduction” from Songs of Innocence & Experience; :The Lamb”; “The Tyger”; “Nurse’s Song”; “The Chimney Sweeper”; “London”; “Auguries of Innocence”; “The Sick Rose”;]  
William Blake [“Proverbs of Hell” The Marriage of Heaven and Hell]

Robert Burns (1759—1796) [“John Anderson, My Jo”; “To a Mouse”; “Auld Lang Syne”; “A Red, Red Rose”]

 
The First Generation & The Lake School of Poetry (William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Robert Southey

William Wordsworth  (1770—1850) [“My Heart Leaps Up”; “A Slumber Did My Spirit Seal”; “The World is Too Much with Us”;]

 
William Wordsworth  [“She Dwelt among the Untrodden Ways”; “We Are Seven”; “Lucy Gray”; “The Prelude”]  
Sir Walter Scott (1771—1832)  [“Lochinvar”; “Proud Maisie” from The Heart of Midlothian;]  
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834) [The Rime of the Ancient Mariner]  
Samuel Taylor Coleridge  (1772—1834) [“Kubla Khan; or, A Vision in a Dream: A Fragment”; Christabel; “Epitaph”;]  
Robert Southey (1774-1843)  [“The Cataract of Lodore”;]  
Thomas Moore (1779-1852)  [“The Harp that once through Tara’s Halls”; “The Last Rose of Summer”; “The Time I’ve Lost in Wooing” “Believe me, if all those endearing young charms”]  
The Second Generation: George Gordon, Lord Byron  (1788—1824)  [“She Walks in Beauty” “When We Two Parted”; “Don Juan”;]  
John Clare (1793-1864)  [“Remember Dear Mary”;]  
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822)  [“Ozymandias”; “To Wordsworth”; “England in 1819”; “Men of England”; “Ode to the West Wind”;]  
John Keats (1795—1821)  [“Ode on a Grecian Urn”; “On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer”;]  

 

Assessment

ASSESSMENT
IN-TERM STUDIES NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Homework/Classwork   10
Mid-terms 1 40
Final 1 50
Total   100
CONTRIBUTION OF FINAL EXAMINATION TO OVERALL GRADE   50
CONTRIBUTION OF IN-TERM STUDIES TO OVERALL GRADE   50
Total   100

 

Course’s Contribution to Program

COURSE'S CONTRIBUTION TO PROGRAMME
Programme Learning Outcomes Contribution
1 2 3 4 5  
The ability to apply knowledge of English and world literature and social sciences to topics including culture, society, ethics, politics etc.       X    
The ability to review, analyse and apply the relevant literature.       X    
The ability to carry out interdisciplinary reading and analysis.   X        
The ability to utilize the basic concepts and issues of literary theories in developing life strategies   X        
Awareness of professional ethics and responsibility       X    
Effective communication skills.       X    
A sufficiently broad education to understand the global and social impact of literary movements.   X        
An awareness of the importance of lifelong learning and the ability to put it into practice.     X      
A knowledge of issues in contemporary literature and of the cultural issues of the period.       X    
The ability to use sources and modern tools in order to carry out research in the areas of literature and aesthetics.     X      

 

ECTS

ECTS ALLOCATED BASED ON STUDENT WORKLOAD BY THE COURSE DESCRIPTION
Activities Quantity Duration
(Hour)
Total Workload (Hour)
Course Duration (Including the exam week: 15x Total course hours) 15 3 45
Hours for off-the-classroom study (Pre-study, practice) 15 3 45
Homework 1 10 10
Assessment   30 30
Total Work Load     130
Total Work Load / 25 (h)     5.2
ECTS Credit of the Course     5