• Turkish
  • English
Course Code: 
ANT 383
Semester: 
Fall
Course Type: 
Core
P: 
3
Lab: 
0
Laboratuvar Saati: 
0
Credits: 
3
ECTS: 
5
Course Language: 
English
Course Objectives: 
The aim of this course is to survey the literature on culture and gender in anthropology and to consider the shifts in thinking about gender. It asks the question, for example, how anthropology approached to sex and gender, what “women’s anthropology” means and differs from mainstream anthropology, and in what dimensions and capacity the feminist anthropology is different from conventional anthropology and so on.
Course Content: 

As an analytical category, the term “gender” became a key concept in social sciences starting in the 1960s, replacing the term “woman.” This shift aimed at discerning the realm of the biological and that of cultural. Throughout the course, we consider examples based fieldwork elucidating epistemology, praxis, and textual representation in/of sex and gender and power in different cultures. Throughout the course, students will be asked to be prepared for the discussion of weekly readings and to deliver short weekly papers.   

Course Methodology: 
1: Lecture, 2: Question-Answer, 3: Discussion
Course Evaluation Methods: 
A: Testing, C: Homework

Vertical Tabs

Course Learning Outcomes

Learning Outcomes

Teaching Methods

Assessment Methods

1)  discusses categories of woman, sex, and gender

1,2,3

A,C

2)   reviews anthropological literature on culture and gender

1,2,3

A,C

3)  analyzes theoretical frameworks and approaches of gender

1,2,3

A,C

4)   examines ethnographies based on gender perspective

1,2,3

A,C

 
 

Course Flow

Week

Topics

Study Materials

1

INTRODUCTION

 

2

Gender and Theoretical Orientations

Scott

3

Study of Gender  in Anthropology

Mascia Lees and Johnson Black

4

Woman and Gender in Anthropology

Rosaldo, Rapp

5

Woman and Culture 2

Slocum, Sacks

6

Evolutionary Models and Their Criticisms

Gender and Anthropology, Ch. 3, pp: 20-39.

7

MIDTERM

 

8

Psychological Models

Gender and Anthropology, Ch. 4, pp: 40-46.

9

Materialist Orientations and Their Criticisms

Gender and Anthropology, Ch. 5, pp:  47-67.

10

Stuructural Approaches and Their Criticisms

Gender and Anthropology, Ch. 6, pp:  68-79.

11

Discourse Analysis and Sociolinguistics Approach

Gender and Anthropology, Ch. 7, pp:  80-91.

Gal.

12

Reflexive Approach and Anthropology

Gender and Anthropology, Ch. 8 and 9, pp:  92-106.

13

Sex and Gender/Biology and Culture

Rapp and Ross

14

 REVIEW

 

15

FINAL

 

 
 

Recommended Sources

Textbook

 

Additional Resources

Scott, Joan. 1988. “Gender as a Useful Category of Historical Analysis,” In Gender and the Politics of History. New York: Columbia University Press, pp:  28-50.

 

Frances E. Mascia-Lees and Nancy Johnson Black.  2000. Gender and Anthropology, Illinois: Waveland Press. Ch.1 and 2, pp: 1-19.

Rosaldo, Michelle Zimbalist, 1974. “Woman, Culture, and Society: A Theoretical Overview.” In Women, Culture and Society.  Michelle Zimbalist Rosaldo and Louise Lamphere, (eds). California: Stanford University Press, pp: 17-42.

 

Rayna R. Reiter. 1975. “Introduction.” In Toward and Anthropology of Women.  New York:  Monthly Review Press, pp:  11-19.

 

Gender and Anthropology, Ch. 4, pp: 40-46.

 

Gender and Anthropology, Ch. 5, pp:  47-67.

 

Gender and Anthropology, Ch. 6, pp:  68-79.

 

Gender and Anthropology, Ch. 7, pp:  80-91.

 

Gender and Anthropology, Ch. 8 and 9, pp:  92-106.

 

Rapp, Rayna ve Ellen Ross. 1981. “Sex and Society: A Research Note from Anthropology and Social History.” Comparative Studies in Society and History (23/1): 51-72.

 
 

Material Sharing

Documents

 

Assignments

 

Exams

 
 
 

Assessment

IN-TERM STUDIES

NUMBER

PERCENTAGE

Midterm

1

30

Class participation, presentations and attendance

2

30

Final

1

40

Total

 

100

CONTRIBUTION OF FINAL EXAMINATION TO OVERALL GRADE

 

40

CONTRIBUTION OF IN-TERM STUDIES TO OVERALL GRADE

 

60

Total

 

100

 

 

COURSE CATEGORY

Expertise/Field Courses

 
 

Course’s Contribution to Program

No

Program Learning Outcomes

Contribution

1

2

3

4

5

1

The Department provides individuals with a possession of anthropological theories and concepts; a good command of knowledge on human development, material culture, and archeological approaches in historical perspectives; it guides individuals who can analyze contemporary issues with an anthropological lens; and those who can retain a critical and analytical thinking ability. 

     

X

 

2

The Department guides future anthropologists who can state the theme of their research with precision, and those who is equipped with the necessary methodology, technical and cultural base and with an awareness of ethical issues for their prospective field research.

   

X

   

3

The Department provides the students with an ability to study the details and dynamics of cultural phenomena; an ability to perceive and interpret the characteristics of Turkish culture   as well as of different ones, with respect to their geographical conditions, historical processes and  dynamics of change. 

       

X

4

The Department provides individuals with a perception and awareness towards the problems of the country and the world;  with a high level of social responsibility, an advanced level of written and oral communication skills; it guides individuals who can take advantage of the sources of information from outside the discipline in the framework of a spirit of life-long learning; and those who can pursue a professional and personal development of life, with a heartfelt joy of living. 

       

X

 

ECTS

Activities

Quantity

Duration
(Hour)

Total
Workload
(Hour)

Course Duration (Including the exam week: 16x Total course hours)

16

3

48

Hours for off-the-classroom study (Pre-study, practice)

     

Mid-terms

     

Homework

     

Final examination

     

Total Work Load

 

 

 

Total Work Load / 25 (h)

 

 

 

ECTS Credit of the Course